Press Statement

Revoking Obama-Era School Discipline Policy Will Undermine Civil Rights Protections for Minority Students

December 18, 2018

WASHINGTON, DC— UnidosUS (formerly NCLR) issued the following statement in response to the release of the Federal Commission on School Safety’s final report of policy recommendations to curb school violence:

“It seems Secretary Devos and the Trump administration remain undeterred in their campaign to roll back civil rights protections for students of color, and the School Safety Commission report is another step in that direction. Rescinding the important guidance set forth by the Obama administration to rein in discriminatory disciplinary practices in schools will only propagate the unfair targeting of minority students and further undermine student safety. The commission fails to acknowledge that students of color are disproportionately impacted and ignores the systemic bias that exists in school discipline. Our students deserve a learning environment in which their safety and success are paramount, and not one in which their safety is jeopardized, their civil rights are threatened, and a heightened police presence is the new norm,” said Amalia Chamorro, Associate Director of UnidosUS’s Education Policy Project.

UnidosUS, previously known as NCLR (National Council of La Raza), is the nation’s largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization. Through its unique combination of expert research, advocacy, programs, and an Affiliate Network of nearly 300 community-based organizations across the United States and Puerto Rico, UnidosUS simultaneously challenges the social, economic, and political barriers that affect Latinos at the national and local levels. For 50 years, UnidosUS has united communities and different groups seeking common ground through collaboration, and that share a desire to make our country stronger. For more information on UnidosUS, visit www.unidosus.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Contact:
Gabriela Gomez
ggomez@unidosus.org
(202) 776-1732