Press Statement

NCLR: Supreme Court Decision a Victory for Higher Education Equity

Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin ruling will help address college admission inequities

June 23, 2016

Contact:
Camila Gallardo
(305) 215-4259
cgallardo@nclr.org

 

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today in the case of Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 4–3 in favor of allowing universities to continue considering race and ethnicity as a factor in selecting incoming students. During oral arguments on the case several months ago, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) President and CEO Janet Murguía joined dozens of activists, including the Rev. Al Sharpton of the National Action Network, on the steps of the Supreme Court in support of affirmative action in college admissions. Today, the organization shared its enthusiastic support of the justices’ decision. One in four students are Latino and students of color represent a majority of the nation’s K–12 enrollment. More needs to be done to provide students an opportunity to overcome obstacles to educational access.

“This is a victory for equity, for enriching the college experience for all students and for our country’s future prosperity. Sixty-five percent of all jobs in the next four years will require some type of postsecondary degree or credential, yet minority students are still facing obstacles to reaching or achieving success in college because of systemic inequities in our society. This all leads to a disadvantage for them when trying to gain admission to selective universities. Now more talented students from all backgrounds will get a fair shot at the school of their choice. Ensuring that we have a well-prepared, diverse, and educated workforce is necessary to our nation’s long-term economic success,” Murguía said.

NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.